[hist-analytic] Common Sensal and Extraordinary Language

Jlsperanza at aol.com Jlsperanza at aol.com
Fri Feb 20 22:04:13 EST 2009


A little tribute to Charlie Dunbar. 
 
           cavell, v. An  exquisitely sensitive distinction of language, 
hence cavellier, adj.  characterizing a writing style common among extraordinary 
language  philosophers.
 
 
 
 
Clarity is _never_ enough! Ask Broad!
 
 
1896 Violeta WELBY in Mind V. 29 
 
"We might be allowed to coin a new derivative and speak of ‘sensal’ where  
we often now speak of ‘verbal’ questions."
 
        Yes, but then again we might  not. 
 
 
 1938 C. D. BROAD Exam. McTaggart's Philos. II. VII. xxxiii. 249, 
 
"I conclude then that McTaggart's argument against the possibility of  
extended particulars, whether material or sensal, breaks down at the fourth step  in 
my synopsis of it."




mctaggart, n. A black hole which not only sheds no light but in which time  
stands still. "Some mctaggarts are rather broad."  --  Dennett.

otherwise, adj. Knowing the difference between two philosophers  with 
identical interests and the same name, hence otherwisdom

In a message dated 2/20/2009 8:14:35 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
baynesrb at yahoo.com writes:

>Maybe a more curious connection is that between Broad and John Wisdom. 
>I was never a big Wisdom fan. I certainly didn't cut my teeth on  Wisdom, 
>but I did do some cutting, Broadly speaking. 
 
I did find his prose refreshing! Those "Other Minds" articles are gems.  
Otherwise, his cousin is never so bright (but then his middle name was Oulton). 
 
>Wisdom (somewhat like Von Wright) was at 
>one time very much under the influence of Broad. 
 
-- Well, they would see each other's face almost every morning I would  hope! 
What a man, Wisdom -- "Some like Moore, but Wisdom's my man", I say.
 
 
>Broad and Grice have very different ideas about 
>how to pursue philosophy. 
 
Yes, and broadly speaking, Charlie Dunbar would label Grice's a 'trivial  
pursuit', rather. 
 
>One thing I've always like 
>about Broad is his incredible understanding of people like Kant and  
Leibniz, 
>as well as his work on sense data. Remember he is really far removed  
generationally from Grice. 
>But you know somethin'? I can't think of any reason to believe that  Broad 
would 
>have taken issue with Grice on 'meaning'! 
 
But then he would have been bored, Grice -- he loved people taking _issue_  
with him! 
 
schiffer, n. (from Neurath, "Wie Schiffer send wir.") One who uses great  
ingenuity in repairing a sinking ship. "There's no griceful way of saving this  
theory; even the rats have abandoned ship. There's no one aboard but the  
schiffer." 
 
-----
 
But yes. And of course, Grice's citing Broad in 1941 is perhaps pretty  
plausible. It was an article for _Mind_ and that was led by Moore (a Cambridge  
one). 
 
I can't quote right now the Broad ref. in Grice (1941) but see that Grice  
starts on p. 330 of that 1941 volume, and who do you think had just finished  
writing on p. 329? None other than good ole John Wisdom, on "Other Minds". Talk  
of a small world.
 
Read from an online dictionary:
 
"sense datum was coined by Moore in 1909" -- 
 
I hate that type of loose use of 'coin' when the OED tidily notes:
 
1882 J. ROYCE in Mind VII. 44 What relation does the external reality bear  
to the sense-datum? 
 
1890 W. JAMES Princ. Psychol. II. xx. 146 
It is no wonder if some authors have gone so far as to think that the  
sense-data have no spatial worth at all. 
 
"Broad was Russell's pupil and his preferred term was 'sensum' (1914) not  
really 'sense-datum' that Russell had used (1912). And then there's "Price"  
("Price had studied with Moore before he returned to Oxford -- where he taught  
Wilfrid Sellars". 'Taught' him only to find hisself refuted by him. Some 
tutees!  (I say that jocularly as I know Bayne loves Sellars too much). 
 
cfr. 
 
1923 C. D. BROAD Sci. Thought viii. 240 
 
"Such objects as y I am going to call Sensa." -- and we are going to  try and 
follow you. 
 
I *have* to paste the 51 entries for Broad in the OED -- de-love-lee!
 
But isn't Bayne write about Broad understanding "Kant"!:

1933 C. D. BROAD Exam. McTaggart's Philos. I. II. vii. 144 It will be  
remembered that Kant, in criticising the Scholastic argument from the simplicity  of 
the soul to its immortality, said that it might cease to exist by  ‘
elanguescence’, as a sound dies away without ‘coming to bits’. 
 
I would think Grice (1941) draws on Broad for 'mnemic' listed below. I seem  
to recall he also makes (Grice does) a complicated point about what kind of  
construction it is he is dealing with ('logical', but what type of logical  
construction) and I seem to remember he credits Broad for some broad (and not so  
broad) distinctions there.
 
1925 C. D. BROAD Mind & its Place viii. 377 Experiences which are owned  in 
senses (2) or (3) may be said to be ‘*mnemically owned’.

Then there's 
1941 Mind 50 417 The only perceptible difference between conscious and  
non-conscious behaviour is *mnemicness.
 
but that mouthful can't be Grice's for his essay ends on p. 350!
 
 
 
Cheers,
 
JL


1  1912    categorial, a.      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place iv. 21 
2   c1325    declare, v.     1965  C. D.  Broad in G. Cummins Swan on B 
3  1827     descriptionist     1914  C. D. Broad Perception ii. 91  The d 
4  1603    disvalue, n.      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place xi. 50 
5   1855    elanguescence, n.     1933  C.  D. Broad Exam. McTaggart's Philo 
6  1938     extrasomatic, a.     1938  C. D. Broad Exam.  McTaggart's Philo 
7  1819    extraspective,  a.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place vii. 3  
8      geo-     1923  C.  D. Broad Sci. Thought xii. 457 A 
9  1750    Horatian, a.  (n.)     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place xi. 49  
10  1914    inferrability      1914  C. D. Broad Perception ii. 128 This 
11   1923    intrapolation     1923  C. D.  Broad Sci. Thought xi. 428 Li 
12  1925     introspectible, a.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its  Place ix. 
41 
13  1633    irreducible,  a.     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought x. 368 The  
14  1849    limiting, ppl. a.      1914  C. D. Broad Perception i. 7 Qualiti 
15   1908    Lorentz     1923  C. D. Broad  Sci. Thought iv. 135 Th 
16  a1613    Mahometanism,  n.     1939  C. D. Broad in Philosophy 14 132 O  
17  1606    mechanist, n. and  adj.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place 43 
One  
18  1909    mechanistically,  adv.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place ii. 
77  
19  ?c1225    memory, n.      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place v. 233 
20   1899    mind-brain, adj. and n.      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place 
439 Th 
21   1908    mnemic, adj.     1925  C. D.  Broad Mind & its Place viii.  
22  1862     molar, adj.3     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place  xiv. 6 
23  1770    molecular, adj. (and  n.)     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place 
xiv. 6  
24  1895    multiplicatively,  adv.     1914  C. D. Broad Perception iii. 180 
The  
25  c1598    naïf, adj. and n.2      1914  C. D. Broad Perception i. 1 We are 
 
26   c1449    neutral, n. and adj.     1925   C. D. Broad Mind & its Place. 
xiv.   
27      non-, prefix      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place xi. 48 
28   1914    non-object, n. and adj.      1914  C. D. Broad Perception i. 8 
We must 
29   1925    non-referential, adj.     1925   C. D. Broad Mind & its Place 
vi. 30 
30  1925     objectifiable, adj.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind &  its Place vi. 
30 
31  1817    occasioning,  adj.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place xii. 5  
32  1704    opus magnum, n.      1952  C. D. Broad Ethics & Hist. Philos.  
33   1610    parallelism, n.     1925  C. D.  Broad Mind & its Place iii. 1 
34  1754     parallelist, n. (and adj.)     1925  C. D. Broad Mind  & its 
Place iii. 1 
35  1878    perceptual,  adj.     1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place iv. 21  
36  1659    percipient, n. and  adj.     1938  C. D. Broad Exam. McTaggart's 
Philo  
37  1856    phenomenalist, n. and  adj.     1914  C. D. Broad Perception 171 
The phen  
38  1566    pink, n.5 and adj.2      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place iv. 
14 
39   1905    polyadic, adj.     1918  C. D.  Broad in Mind 27 284 A consi 
40  1571    positional,  adj.     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought xi. 408 So  
41  1907    presentedness,  n.      philosophy of  C. D. Broad) the awareness 
 of this  
42  1611    primeness,  n.     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought ii. 75 We   
43  c1443    probability, n.      1914  C. D. Broad Perception ii. 150 The   
44      quasi-, comb. form      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place iv. 21 
45   1603    regularity     1925  C. D. Broad  Mind & its Place x. 457 
46  1835    relationist, n.  (and a.)     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought iii. 
89 Th  
47  1863    relativist, n. (and  a.)     1914  C. D. Broad Perception v. 286 
It is  
48      retro-, prefix      1962  C. D. Broad Lect. Psychical Res. 40 
49   1923    Russellian, a. and n.     1923   C. D. Broad Sci. Thought xiii. 
534  
50  a1866     sensal, a.     1938  C. D. Broad Exam. McTaggart's  Philo 
51  c1400    sense, n.      1925  C. D. Broad Mind & its Place iv. 19 
52   1868    sensum     1923  C. D. Broad  Sci. Thought viii. 240  
53  1900     spatio-temporal, a.     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought  x. 403 
Sci 
54  1375    sufficient, a. (adv.,  n.)     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought 
xiii. 499   
55      tele-     1962  C.  D. Broad Lect. on Psychical Res. 
56  1798     teleological, a.     1930  C. D. Broad Five Types of  Ethical T 
57  a800    tie, n.      1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought ii. 75 Tak 
58   1745    transience     1914  C. D. Broad  Perception ii. 105 Leib 
59  1813    translational,  a.     1923  C. D. Broad Sci. Thought xi. 433 A   



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