[hist-analytic] Deliberation and Grammar

Baynesr at comcast.net Baynesr at comcast.net
Fri Jul 10 19:10:43 EDT 2009


I cannot utter 'Himself likes John' with the intent of saying 'John likes himself'. 

This is not just because I know English. My intention to say 'John likes himself' by saying 'himself like John' is grammatically excluded. Notice it can be argued, although nothing here is obvious, that synonomy is actually ruled out by the grammar, not the semantics. Anyway, we have it that a "mental fact," an intention is ruled out by syntax. Similarly, I believe, Aristotle observed that a deliberative desire, another "mental fact," is ruled out should it require deliberating about things outside of our power. 

Bruce remarks: 

"But surely I can utter "Bonjour" with the intention of saying "Hello" even though "Bonjour" is not a sentence. Am I missing something?" 

There is nothing ungrammatical about 'Bonjour'. There are problems you *may* be alluding to related to Church's criticism of Carnap (950), but I don't see how they would tie in here. I stick within the grammar of any given language. 

Regards 

STeve 

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Bruce Aune" <aune at philos.umass.edu> 
To: Baynesr at comcast.net 
Cc: "hist-analytic" <hist-analytic at simplelists.co.uk> 
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2009 3:28:14 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific 
Subject: Re: Deliberation and Grammar 

Steve says, " I cannot utter ‘x’ with the intention of saying ‘y’ unless ‘y’ 
is a sentence and..." But surely I can utter "Bonjour" with the intention of saying "Hello" even though "Bonjour" is not a sentence. Am I missing something? 


Bruce
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