[hist-analytic] Hist-Analytic additions: Passmore, G. H. Hardy, Hintikka, Korner, Russell

steve bayne baynesrb at yahoo.com
Mon May 10 16:59:57 EDT 2010


Hist-Analytic is pleased to announce additions to its
data base. They are:

Selections from _A Hundred Years of Philosophy_ by J. A.
Passmore

"Russell and Moore"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Passmore100ix.pdf

Critical Realism and American Naturalism
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Passmore100xii.pdf

"Logical Positivism"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Passmore100xvi.pdf

"Wittgenstein and Ordinary Language Philosophy"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Passmore100xviii.pdf

Passmore's Notes:
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Passmore100biblio1.pdf

***

Selections from _Pure Mathematics_ (1914)  by G. H. Hardy

"Real Variables"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Hardy1.pdf

"Functions and Real Variables"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Hardy2.pdf

"Limits of Functions of a Continuous Variable: Continuous
and Discrete Functions"
http://www.hist-analytic.org/HardyV.pdf

***
"Cogito, Ergo, Sum: Inference or Performance?" by J.
Hintikka (1962)
http://www.hist-analytic.org/HintikkaD.pdf

***
"Mathematics as the Science of Formal Systems" and
"Mathematics as the Activity of Intuitive Construction"
(1960) by Stephan Korner
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Korner1960.pdf

***
"Mathematical Logic as Based on the Theory of Types (1908)
by Bertrand Russell
http://www.hist-analytic.org/Russell1908.pdf


Passmore has been a personal inspiration in introducing
Hist-Analytic.org. It is a pleasure to bring his exemplary
scholarship to the attention of the growing number of
people interested in quality historical work in this field.
This is the be best book, in my opinion, on this subject.

The comments by Hardy on continuity, and "accumulation
points," Heine-Borel, etc. are worth looking at. Sections
can sometimes be read separately.

Korner gives a very lucid introduction to all the hub-bub
about intuitionism in mathematics. He's good on Kant,
as a rule and has a broad, but historically well informed,
perspective.

The Hintikka paper is in bad shape. I do this out of
"garage" in a manner of speaking and it was my only
available copy. Sorry. I'll improve on this later.

The Russell paper is the classic statement of the theory
of types.  It's availability, public-access, is far overdue.

Steven R. Bayne




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