The Carnap-Quine Dialogue in Seven Acts
Overview
A survey, analysis and critique of Quine's writings on Carnap's philosophy, the analytic/synthetic distingtion and related matters, including truth by convention, modality and reference, semantics and ontology.
Sources
We are concerned with a dialogue running over a period of 20+ years. At this point we have here just a list of pertinent writings and links to such notes as I may have on them.
Carnap
Quine
Act I: Logical Syntax
Act II: Truth by Convention
Quine gave three lectures on Carnap's Philosophy of Logical Syntax at Harvard in 1934. The first of these lectures provided the basis for the paper Truth by Convention [Quine36].
Act III: Introduction to Semantics
Introduction to Semantics (1941)
Act IV: Analyticity and Necessity
Notes on Existence and Necessity (1943)
Carnap-Quine Correspondence (1943)
Act V: Meaning and Necessity
The Problem of Interpreting Modal Logic (1947)
Act VI: Ontological Interlude
Act VII: Two Dogmas
Act VIII: Epilogue
Meaning Postulates (1952)
Meaning and Synonymy in Natural Languages (1955)
The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap (Schillp)
W.V.Quine on Logical Truth (1954)
Quine's Lectures on Carnap (1934)
Quine gave three lectures on Carnap's Philosophy of Logical Syntax at Harvard in 1934. The first of these lectures provided the basis for the paper Truth by Convention [Quine36].
Background
A few words placing the lectures in historical context.
Lecture I: The A Priori
Quine's first lecture addresses primarily the concept of analyticity and also the a priori, not professing to be an account of Carnap's philosophy, but rather as providing introductory background prior to an account of Carnap's philosophy of logical syntax in the second and third lectures.
Lecture II: Syntax
On Carnap's syntactic methods and the method of arithmetisation.
Lecture III: Philosophy as Syntax
Here Quine tells the story of how these syntactic methods are to transform philosophy.


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